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Top 7 Wonders of the Technological World

With all the discussion around the net regarding the new 7 wonders of the world, I thought that a nice complement to that would the be the 7 wonders of the technological world. I searched around for inspiration and was surprised to find that no one has put together a really decent list. One of the prominent lists I did find included Microsoft Surface – how ridiculous! (I wonder who owns that newspaper). So, without further ado, here is the list of the Top 7 Wonders of the Technological World.

Courtesy- http://listverse.com/2007/09/07/top-7-wonders-of-the-technological-world/

Elon Musk- Explorer, Inventor, Engineer

Born in South Africa in 1971, Elon Musk became a multimillionaire in his late 20s when he sold his start-up company, Zip2, to a division of Compaq Computers. He achieved more success by founding X.com in 1999, SpaceX in 2002 and Tesla Motors in 2003. Musk made headlines in May 2012, when SpaceX launched a rocket that would send the first commercial vehicle to the International Space Station. He bolstered his portfolio with the purchase of SolarCity in 2016, and cemented his standing as a leader of industry by taking on an advisory role in the early days of President Donald Trump’s administration.

Article courtesy- https://www.biography.com/people/elon-musk-20837159

Image courtesy- wikipedia

Future technology: 22 ideas about to change our world

Floating farms, brain wave passwords, and coffee-powered cars are just some of the incredible inventions and innovations that will shape our future.

NASA has challenged designers to develop a conventional drone to work inside a space station, navigating with no ‘up’ or ‘down’. The winning design, ArachnoBeeA, would use cameras and tiny beacons to manoeuvre its way around. How popular drones would be in such a confined space is a different question.

Article courtesy- http://www.sciencefocus.com/feature/future/future-technology-22-ideas-about-change-our-world

Another 5 Star review

It was great honor to work with the team at Cupe728.ca for redesigning of their website. CUPE 728 represents the 4000+ Support Workers for S.D.36. (Attendants, Bus Drivers, Clerical, Caretakers, Maintenance, EAs, and Student Support and many more).

They approached us for making a more end user focused website which was easy to navigate and was accessible on all electronic devices. They have heavy traffic on the website as most of the members check the website very frequently. We also made a custom interface for social media interactions. Cupe728 is very active on social media with lots of announcements to keep members engaged. The custom interface we designed made sure that the live post from social media gets updated on the home page automatically.

It was great working with Ryan Groundwater (President- Cupe728), Marcey Campbell (Communications Officer), Debra Merrier (Secretary Treasurer) and the entire team at Cupe728. Marcey, Thanks for your 5 star review.

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Who discovered World wide web!!!!!!!!!!– A tribute

Biography

Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989. He founded and Directs the World Wide Consortium (W3C) the forum for technical development of the Web. He founded the Web Foundation whose mission is that the WWW serves Humanity, and co-founded the Open Data Institute in London. His research group at MIT’s Computer Science and AI Lab (“CSAIL”) plans to re-decentralize the Web. Tim spends a lot of time fighting for rights such as privacy, freedom and openness of the Web.

A graduate of Oxford University, Tim Berners-Lee invented the Web while at CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory, in 1989. He wrote the first web client and server in 1990. His specifications of URIs, HTTP and HTML were refined as Web technology spread.

He is the 3Com Founders Professor of Engineering in the School of Engineering with a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Laboratory for Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence ( CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he also heads the Decentralized Information Group (DIG). He is also a Professor in the Electronics and Computer Science Department at the University of Southampton, UK.

Tim is the Director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), a Web standards organization founded in 1994 which develops interoperable technologies (specifications, guidelines, software, and tools) to lead the Web to its full potential. He is a Director of the World Wide Web Foundation which was launched in 2009 to coordinate efforts to further the potential of the Web to benefit humanity.

In 2011 he was named to the Board of Trustees of the Ford Foundation, a globally oriented private foundation with the mission of advancing human welfare. He has promoted open government data globally and is a member of the UK’s Transparency Board. He is President of London’s Open Data Institute.

In 2001 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society. He has been the recipient of several international awards including the Japan Prize, the Prince of Asturias Foundation Prize, the Millennium Technology Prize and Germany’s Die Quadriga award. In 2004 he was knighted by H.M. Queen Elizabeth and in 2007 he was awarded the Order of Merit. In 2009 he was elected a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences. He is the author of “Weaving the Web”.

On March 18 2013, Tim, along with Vinton Cerf, Robert Kahn, Louis Pouzin and Marc Andreesen, was awarded the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering for “ground-breaking innovation in engineering that has been of global benefit to humanity.”

Source- https://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/

Mobile Applications

When Does an App Make Sense?

Despite the many inherent benefits of the mobile web, apps are still very popular, and there are a number of specific use scenarios where an app will be your best choice. Generally speaking, if you need one of the following, an app makes sense:

Interactivity/Gaming – for interactive games (think Angry Birds) an app is almost always going to be your best choice, at least for the foreseeable future.

Regular Usage/Personalization – If your target users are going to be using your app in a personalized fashion on a regular basis (think EverNote) then an app provides a great way to do that.
Complex Calculations or Reporting – If you need something that will take data and allow you to manipulate it with complex calculations, charts or reports (think banking or investment) an app will help you do that very effectively.

Native Functionality or Processing Required – mobile web browsers are getting increasingly good at accessing certain mobile-specific functions such as click-to-call, SMS and GPS. However, if you need to access a user’s camera or processing power an app will still do that much more effectively.

No connection Required – If you need to provide offline access to content or perform functions without a network/wireless connection then an app makes sense.

As with any project, when developing an app you want to ensure that your are getting an optimal return on your investment. What you want to avoid at all costs is the needless and expensive exercise of building an app to do something basic that can be achieved with a mobile website.

Source- www.hswsolutions.com

EFFECTIVE NAVIGATION & USER FRIENDLY WEBSITE

Have a clear and well organized navigation to make your website friendly for your visitors. Try to limit the number of menu items as far as possible. Having a navigation structure that makes sense to a user will help them to get to what they are looking for and will create more sales for your business. This means fully maximizing your business’ online presence and investing in responsive website design so that your website is optimized for users that come to your website on tablet and mobile devices. Having a mobile optimized website and a clear navigation structure will help users, your bottom line and also search engine rankings.
White designing the navigation following factors need to be considered:
1. Easy

It should be easy for your clients to find their way through your website. The navigation bar should be easily visible. The most common area to put the navigation bar is on the top. Its important to list the Menus and sub menus so that your clients know what are the contents of your website.
2. Consistent

Navigation should be consistent and use the similar colors, styling, fonts and position on each page of a website. If your clients get surprised at each section of your website they are likely to get frustrated and leave your website.
2. Obvious

The menu and sub menu names should be easy to understand and follow. Your clients should know in the first instance what they are likely to find in each section. Labels such as About, Gallery etc are the industry standard.
3. Less is More

The website should be neatly organized into top levels and sub sections. It’s important not to clutter the website with too many unnecessary and redundant menus. Try and keep the user experience simple and easy.

Image- ozcareer.com.au

Write about something people care about

Nobody knows your business like you do — so what kind of expert advice or tips do you have that you can share? If not, you can at least discuss news relating to your business. When in doubt, look at your list of SEO keywords and see what kind of list, link bait or in-depth posts you can work those keywords into. Don’t be afraid to interview some experts, either (if you quote them and feature their expertise in your post, they’ll be likely to share your content via their social channels — this way, you can leverage larger networks to increase the size of your own).

Some ways to create good SEO-friendly content

1. Choose organic: Incorporating highly visible, popular SEO keywords into your articles is one of the best ways to drive up your recommendations. Major caveat: these keywords need to be included in a way that feels organic to the subject matter. They mustn’t stand out or be jarring to the reader. Readers, especially those who spend a lot of time in the digital world, are extremely capable of noticing if you’ve just stuffed your work full of words you hope will drive up visibility.
2. Keyword placement: Make sure you optimize the placement of keywords in your SEO articles by putting them in your titles and subtitles. Create a hierarchy of keywords and use the most search generating up front. Be sure to use your most important keywords in the title.

3. Picture this: Include images with alt text to get your page showing up in image searches as well. Images will also break up the text in a dynamic way. Image-driven content is getting more and more play as a digital marketing technique and it is especially suited to viral content.

Source- outbrain.com

Image- www.entrepreneur.com

What makes an article good?

While truly great writing can’t be taught, good writing definitely can. As a marketer, you are ultimately a storyteller, conveying the story of your brand through different mediums and reframed for different audiences. Now all you need to do is translate this skill to the page. Here are some best practices for creating impressive, captivating articles:

1. Use concrete examples: Nothing gives writing more power than strong, relatable examples. Avoid the purely theoretical by using case studies when talking about a product’s success or focusing on one customer’s story. Find points of connection in news or pop culture to give your reader a frame of reference. These tangible stories will stay with them longer than facts or numbers.

2. Don’t hide your voice: One of the best things you can do for your brand is to give it a unique voice. Don’t be afraid to be funny (if you are funny), quirky, even a little bit weird. It can be helpful to read the piece aloud to see if it sounds like you. Your genuine voice is one of your greatest assets. Yes, you need to adhere to the standard of professionalism appropriate for your industry, but the more you sound like a human being, the more people will want to engage with you – by re-posting, commenting, and finally, by purchasing your service or product.

3. Know your audience: Your blog is not your diary, nor is it an interoffice memo. Make sure you choose language suitable for whomever you’re addressing. If you’re writing for a larger audience, stay away from jargon. Keep paragraphs short and on-point, and section difficult-to-understand material into digestible concepts. Include links to examples that will help elucidate the work. Finally, become your fiercest critic: revise, revise, and revise again. Circle the ideas you find irresistible and cut everything else. The more focused you are, the more your audience will be able to gain from your work.

Article source- outbrain.com

Image- udemy.com

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